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Day 66: Tilly and Milly

I’m back at home for Christmas and whilst looking through some old art things I found my old illustrations of Flossie and Wol’s predecessors. I came up with the basic outline of their story about 9 years ago, and it centred around a little girl, Tilly, and her dog Milly. Aesthetically they have changed a lot, as I have grown up and my style of illustration evolves. But they are still essentially the same, or at least the characters have the same relationship. I’m not sure whether writing a story about toys means I have to justify why they are able to speak to each other.. Or can I just assume that everyone accepts their toys come to life as soon as you turn your back? Because obviously they do. People know that right?

old illustration collage

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Day 45: Tis the season to be jolly busy.

I’m suffering a crisis of inspiration. I could use the time to sort my life out… my flat is a state, there’s a mountain of laundry to do, need to go food shopping, should attempt some sort of academic progress, Christmas shopping, ¬†blah blah etc. AND my landlady is coming to inspect on Friday – suspect reasonable grounds for eviction.¬†Flossie is being less than helpful, she insists its time to get the Christmas decorations out and there has been some confusion about what exactly we’re decorating.

christmas wol

I’ve been trying to think about what makes a classic a classic. Beatrix Potter for example, her Peter Rabbit has been adored by children for over a century; so what is it that makes a character endure? I haven’t come up with anything sensible. Wol thinks Peter Rabbit probably had his wings sewn on better. Flossie already sees her name lit up amongst the likes of Winnie the Pooh and Mary Poppins. Everyone has a favourite childhood book, so this is my Christmas appeal to you: tell me what yours is and why did it appeal so much? Over and out.